Newhouse students cover Election Day from polling places across the U.S.

Nearly 100 Newhouse students filed voter-focused Election Day stories from polling places in Onondaga County and across the country for Democracy in Action.

Students Domenica Orellana and Sam Harasimowicz anchor the 9:10 update on Nov. 3, 2020.

Newhouse journalism and photography students spent Election Day at polling place covering voters’ stories for the Democracy in Action (DIA) project.

The idea behind DIA is to take the focus off of the candidates and the campaigns and put it on the voters and their reasons for voting, says DIA co-director and chair of the broadcast and digital journalism (BDJ) department, Chis Tuohey.

“Elections are a huge part of journalism,” says Tuohey. “What makes it even more challenging and exciting is that there will be surprises along the way.”

On a normal class day, students pitch stories in advance and have ample preparation time. But on Election Day, the only things students know ahead of time are which polling place they’re going to and what time to be there.

“It forces them to be assertive, creative and resourceful as reporters,” says Tuohey. “In many cases they are scared to death that they may not come up with a story. [Most] of the time, they do.”

A long line of voters waiting to get inside their polling place.
Voters wait in line in North Syracuse. (Amanda Albert)

Isabel Tabs, a senior BDJ student, had a rough start at her polling place, Erwin First United Methodist Church in Syracuse.

“Some people in the polling site complained when they saw [a] camera and were very verbally aggressive with me, telling me I needed to leave the site,” she says.

Despite this, Tabs was able to control the situation and successfully finish her story, thanks to assistant teaching professor Jim Osman. A former Washington bureau chief for Media General, Osman prepared his students with responses to possible complications they might run into at polling places.

“I find it my obligation to tell students what they may encounter based on my 25 years of experience covering elections,” says Osman. “Talking about it in class and doing it are two totally different things.”

“I stood my ground and told them the rules and highly emphasized the fact that I would not be filming anyone’s ballot,” says Tabs. “Besides this hurdle, I had a very educational and rewarding experience.”

In a typical year, the almost 100 students participating in DIA would cover Onondaga county and tell stories local to Syracuse. This year, because some students are studying remotely, stories came in from all over the country.

Morgan Tucker, a junior in newspaper and online journalism, covered her local polling place in Hamilton Township, New Jersey. Like Tabs, Tucker was told that she was not allowed to be at the polls. She called adjunct instructor Megan Craig, who told Tucker she had the right to be there as long as she stood 100 feet away from the polling station.

“I went back in and told them, and they responded well,” says Tucker. “My story ended up being pretty wholesome and inspiring because all of the workers were really passionate in their responses. I felt good submitting the story and was proud of myself for turning around the story so fast.”

Craig sees the value of a project like DIA as twofold. “Students gain invaluable insights into life as an on-the-beat reporter, and the community is given the gift of 100 extra reporters telling their stories on what’s sure to be a historic day,” says Craig. “I [was] particularly excited for students to find those small human interest stories that perfectly encapsulate the importance of the day and the importance of voting.”

For Tucker, the best part of the experience was being taken seriously as a reporter by those at the polls, she says.

“It was cool to have people treat me like a real reporter rather than a student,” says Tucker. “I am more confident than I was about approaching strangers, fighting for my First Amendment rights and turning around a story in a day.”

A woman and her two daughters smile and show off their "I voted" sticker.
Katelyn Kriesel and her daughters on election day in Manlius, New York. (Victoria Radis)

“It is critical for student journalists to take part in Democracy in Action so they know how to cover elections and our democracy when they enter the professional world,” says Osman. “There is nothing more important in the work we do as journalists. We owe viewers the best coverage that is unbiased and informative.”

Students posted stories on the Democracy in Action website at dia-cny.syr.edu. In addition, several of the student stories were published at Syracuse.com.

Adrianne Morales is a senior in the broadcast and digital journalism program at the Newhouse School.

Students cover Election Day as part of Democracy in Action project

Newhouse students will spend Election Day reporting live from polling places as part of the Democracy in Action (DIA) project, now in its 11th year.

Students in the broadcast and digital journalism; magazine, news and digital journalism; and photography programs will file stories on the DIA website and provide voter-focused election news, reporting on the human element of the election—from polling place workers to first-time voters.

Students will cover Election Day activities in Onondaga County as well as counties across the U.S., with contributions from students who are studying remotely this semester. The website will include a section titled “Beyond CNY,” featuring stories from locations such as Florida and California.

Reporters will head out early Tuesday morning and provide live election reporting throughout the day.

What makes Election Day stories different from the typical reporting work Newhouse students do is that when the students go out into the field, they have no idea what their stories are going to be about, says broadcast and digital journalism chair Chris Tuohey.

“Usually, we stress the importance of preparation,” says Tuohey. “In DIA, the students only know what polling place they are going to and what time they are going there. In many cases they are scared to death they may not come up with a story. Ninety-nine-point-nine percent of the time, they do.”

Follow the students’ Election Day reporting by visiting dia-cny.syr.edu Nov. 3, and follow on Twitter at @DemocracyAction and #nhdia.

Adrianne Morales is a senior in the broadcast and digital journalism program at the Newhouse School.

Pacheco interviewed by Fast Company about augmented reality

Dan Pacheco, Peter A. Horvitz endowed chair in journalism innovation, was interviewed by Fast Company for the article, “AR is finally infiltrating everyday tasks such as Google search.”

“We are three-dimensional creatures whose media is mostly stuck on two-dimensional rectangles. As our content starts to integrate the third dimension in ways that resonate, we gravitate toward it.”

Dan Pacheco

Newhouse students win awards in three media competitions

This weekend, Newhouse students picked up wins in three college media competitions: The College Media Association’s Pinnacle Awards; the College Media Association’s Film & Audio Festival; and The Associated Collegiate Press Awards.

Pinnacle Awards

Organizational Award

Four-Year Daily Newspaper of the Year
3rd Place: The Daily Orange

Online

Best Breaking News Coverage
1st Place: Shannon Stubbs & Anne Hayes, The NewsHouse: “#NotAgainSUspended: Latest sit-in prompts student suspensions

Best Podcast
Honorable Mention: Tony Coffield and Katy MacDonald, Rooted: “The Alpacas of Rocking Horse Farm

Advertising

Best Social Media Strategy
Honorable Mention: Brooke Schneider, David Schneidman and Shannon Stubbs: High Stakes – The NewsHouse

Design

Best Magazine News Page/Spread
1st Place: Jerk, The Protest Issue

Best Online Main Page
3rd Place: Kevin Camelo: High Stakes – The NewsHouse

Best Editorial Illustration
3rd Place: Katie Mulligan, Jerk: “The Sweet Side of College

Best Magazine Contents Page/Spread
Honorable Mention: Jerk, February 2020

Sports

Best Multimedia Story
2nd Place: The NewsHouse & Military Visual Program: “The Modern Day Gladiator

Best Sports Feature
Honorable Mention: Josh Schafer, The Daily Orange: “In a city full of Girards, Joseph Girard III made it big

CMA Film & Audio Festival

Long Documentary
2nd Place: Franklin E.S. Harris Jr., Danian Douglas and Somers T. Steelman, Unexpected Bond

Short Documentary
2nd Place: Madeline Powell (AJ ’20), I Am My Crown: Natural Hair

Video Feature Package
Honorable Mention: Kate Mazade (AJ ’20), National Veterans Resource Center

National Pacemakers

Newspaper: The Daily Orange
Magazine: SALT, Military Photojournalism 2020
Online: The Daily Orange

Reporter of the Year

3rd Place: Emma Folts, The Daily Orange

Story of the Year

Sports Feature Story
1st Place: Josh Schafer, The Daily Orange
In a city full of Girards, Joseph Girard III made it big

Breaking News:
2nd Place: Kallan Arkeder, Toby Craner, Meilin Quinn, The NewsHouse
Protest spills into the streets as both sides dispute negotiation efforts

In-depth News Story:
2nd Place: Patrick Linehan, Rocio Fortuny, High Stakes
New York college students eagerly await  marijuana legalization

Feature Story:
2nd Place: Jordan Muller, The Daily Orange
By chance: Students who switched tickets escaped the Pan Am Flight 103 bombing

Sports Game Story
2nd Place: Andrew Graham, The Daily Orange
Louisville crushes Syracuse’s bowl game ambitions with 56-34 win

Ernie Pyle Human Interest Profile:
4th Place: Amanda Paule, The NewsHouse
Neal Powless: SU Ombuds brings a message of healing to a polarized world

5th Place: Kimiko Dugan, SALT magazine
Life after loss

Multimedia

Multimedia News Story
1st Place: The High Stakes Staff, High Stakes

Multimedia Sports Story
1st Place: The Military Motion Media Program, The NewsHouse, “The Modern Day Gladiator

Multimedia Feature Story
Honorable Mention: Madeline Powell, The NewsHouse, “Changing stigma around coils, kinks, curls of natural hair

Photo Slideshow
Honorable Mention: Emily Kenny, High Stakes, “A hemp harvest festival buzzes with freedom in the heart of New York

COVID-19 Coverage

Print: COVID 19 News or Feature Story
Honorable Mention: The Daily Orange Staff,  Diplomas and doubts: April 27 issue

Design

Newspaper Page/Spread
1st Place: Talia Trackim, The Daily Orange, “In the Spotlight”

Magazine Page/Spread
Honorable Mention: Zarah Myers, SALT: Military Photojournalism 2020

Illustration
Honorable Mention: Jordan Larson, High Stakes, “Lack of regulations pose conundrum for vape users

Photo

Environmental Portrait
3rd Place: Emily Kenny, The NewsHouse
Honorable Mention: Lauren Miller, The Daily Orange

Feature Photo
Honorable Mention: Emily Steinberger, The Daily Orange

Best Use of Social Media

Social Media Promotion
1st Place: Brooke Schneider, David Schneidman and Shannon Stubbs, High Stakes

Advertising

Newspaper Special Section/Advertising
Honorable Mention: Orientation Guide 2019, The Daily Orange

Congratulations, winners!

Gutterman speaks to WAER about social media blocking article on Biden’s son

Roy Gutterman, associate professor of magazine, news and digital journalism and Tully Center director, was interviewed by WAER for the story, “SU Professor Challenges Recent “Censorship” by Social Media.”

Gutterman writes about the importance of the right to vote for Syracuse.com

Roy Gutterman, associate professor of magazine, news and digital journalism and Tully Center director, wrote the opinion piece, “The right to vote is ‘the essence of a democratic society.’ Exercise it,” for Syracuse.com.

The right to vote has been a hard-fought right that embodies the most basic part of the democratic system: choosing the people and officials who will design, set and enforce laws and public policy, and defining what our society stands for.

Roy S. Gutterman

Sports Media and Communications Track

The Sports Media and Communications track is a specialized series of courses for graduate students interested in sports media.

The Newhouse School is the proud alma mater of many of the top people in all areas of sports media. To foster the school’s strength in sports communications, we developed the Sports Media and Communications Track (SMC), a specialized track for graduate students in broadcast and digital journalism; magazine, news and digital journalism; and television, radio and film.

Requirements:

As a graduate student in SMC, you complete the required coursework for your degree plus additional required and elective classes in sports communications. These include:

Your SMC classroom experiences will be enhanced by numerous speakers and guest lectures from leaders in sports communications, on-campus opportunities with Syracuse Athletics, ACC Network, CitrusTV, the Daily Orange and several radio stations as well alumni connections and career opportunities.

If you want to be part of the Sports Media and Communications Track, indicate your interest on your application for admission to the master’s program.

Olivia Stomski oversees the SMC and is director of the Newhouse Sports Media Center.

Fashion and Beauty Communications Milestone

The fashion and beauty communications milestone prepares students from Newhouse and the College of Visual and Performing Arts to become either mass media or fashion design specialists.

The Sequence

The Fashion & Beauty Communications Milestone is a sequence of courses designed for Syracuse University students studying at the Newhouse School and the College of Visual and Performing Arts. The milestone recognizes the tremendous cultural force of fashion and offers students a rigorous, cross-disciplinary concentration of study that provides them with an expertise in fashion and beauty communications. Syracuse University is uniquely qualified to deliver this specialized concentration given the national reputations of the Newhouse School and the Visual and Performing Arts’ Fashion Design program.

The Collaboration

This collaboration between two professional schools provides a unique and important educational opportunity. As majors in their respective programs, milestone students become either mass-media or fashion design specialists. This experience also allows students to build on a common area of interest—fashion and beauty communications—and gain access to coursework, professors and students beyond their home school and to apply what they have learned to another field of study. Milestone students use required electives efficiently and effectively, securing expertise and experience in another subject and at another school.

The Coursework

The professionally focused experience features five required courses that explore the fashion and beauty industries from a variety of perspectives. To that end, the milestone covers the history of fashion; contemporary fashion as it relates to popular culture; beauty and diversity in fashion media; visual communications theory and practice; fashion and beauty advertising and promotion; fashion photography; fashion and beauty journalism; and a variety of digitally focused classes.

Classes aren’t listed online because they change each semester and students have several classes to choose from within the curriculum. But one fixed offering in the sequence is Beauty & Diversity in Media, a three-credit class that explores issues, controversies, and ideas surrounding diversity and that encourages students to think critically about beauty ideals. Classes that have been offered in the past include:

The Distinction

Over the course of two or three years, students earn a milestone distinction in Fashion and Beauty Communications in addition to earning their current Newhouse or fashion design major and respective minor. Students use their elective credits to complete the required courses for the milestone. Please note: This is not a minor, and as such, it does not appear on a student’s transcript. However, students are encouraged to tout this designation on their résumés and to use the experiences and opportunities featured in the sequence to demonstrate their expertise in interviews and job applications. In addition to the required classes, students must finish a final practicum that draws upon the knowledge and experience from their classes toward the creation of a final project that students can use as part of a portfolio. In addition, the sequence features a range of professional opportunities, including benchmark trips, guest speakers, internships and study-abroad programs.

The Practicum

As one of the final requirements to complete the sequence, students gain professional experience by completing a practicum. Examples of past practicums include fashion production opportunities, coordinating the fashion film series, planning guest speakers, multi-platform publications, fashion communications-based internships, research papers and gallery exhibit planning.

Students may submit their practicum proposals using this online form.

Students may submit their completed practicum using this online form.

Summary of Requirements

To complete this sequence, students are required to complete five classes from the approved list designed for Fashion and Beauty Communications, one final practicum project and must attend all milestone events to stay active in the sequence. We recommend that interested students meet with their academic recorder prior to applying to ensure that our sequence fits with their current academic plans.

The Application Process

Applications typically are accepted once each semester—late September/early October for fall admission (open to sophomores only) and the month of February for spring admission for freshmen and sophomores.

Interested students may email fashions@syr.edu for more information.

Co-Directors

The Fashion and Beauty Communications Milestone is co-directed by:

Melissa Chessher of the Newhouse School and Jeffrey Mayer of the College of Visual and Performing Arts.

Academic coordinator is Jessica Del Fuoco, of the Newhouse School.

Newhouse students, media named as finalists in Associated Collegiate Press Awards

Newhouse students and media outlets racked up 24 nominations in this year’s Associated Collegiate Press Awards, including three National Pacemaker finals for The Daily Orange and SALT, the military photojournalism magazine.

In addition, newspaper and online journalism junior Emma Folts is a finalist for Reporter of the Year.

Winners will be announced Oct. 22. Congratulations, finalists!

National Pacemakers

Newspaper: The Daily Orange
Magazine: SALT, Military Photojournalism 2020
Online: The Daily Orange

Reporter of the Year

Emma Folts, The Daily Orange

Story of the Year

Breaking News:
Kallan Arkeder, Toby Craner, Meilin Quinn, The NewsHouse
Protest spills into the streets as both sides dispute negotiation efforts

In-depth News Story:
Patrick Linehan, Rocio Fortuny, High Stakes
New York college students eagerly await  marijuana legalization

Feature Story:
Jordan Muller, The Daily Orange
By chance: Students who switched tickets escaped the Pan Am Flight 103 bombing

Sports Game Story
Andrew Graham, The Daily Orange
Louisville crushes Syracuse’s bowl game ambitions with 56-34 win

Sports Feature Story
Josh Schafer, The Daily Orange
In a city full of Girards, Joseph Girard III made it big

Ernie Pyle Human Interest Profile:
Amanda Paule, The NewsHouse
Neal Powless: SU Ombuds brings a message of healing to a polarized world

Kimiko Dugan, SALT magazine
Life after loss

Multimedia

Multimedia News Story
The High Stakes Staff, High Stakes

Multimedia Feature Story
Madeline Powell, The NewsHouse, “Changing stigma around coils, kinks, curls of natural hair

Multimedia Sports Story
The Military Motion Media Program, The NewsHouse, “The Modern Day Gladiator

Photo Slideshow
Emily Kenny, High Stakes, “A hemp harvest festival buzzes with freedom in the heart of New York

COVID-19 Coverage

Print: COVID 19 News or Feature Story
The Daily Orange Staff,  Diplomas and doubts: April 27 issue

Design

Newspaper Page/Spread
Talia Trackim, The Daily Orange, “In the Spotlight”

Magazine Page/Spread
Zarah Myers, SALT: Military Photojournalism 2020

Illustration
Jordan Larson, High Stakes, “Lack of regulations pose conundrum for vape users

Photo

Feature Photo
Emily Steinberger, The Daily Orange

Environmental Portrait
Emily Kenny, The NewsHouse
Lauren Miller, The Daily Orange

Best Use of Social Media

Social Media Promotion
Brooke Schneider, David Schneidman and Shannon Stubbs, High Stakes

Advertising

Newspaper Special Section/Advertising
Orientation Guide 2019, The Daily Orange

Newhouse students win National Native Media Awards

Several students who participated in last year’s Borderlines project from The NewsHouse won National Native Media Awards from the Native American Journalists Association for their stories from the Akwesasne Mohawk Nation territory that spans the U.S.-Canada border in northern New York.

Winners will be announced in an online ceremonyThursday, Oct. 15. 

Online

Best News Story
First Place: Molly Gibbs & Rebecca Lan: Unwelcome at Home: Borders challenge Haudenosaunee identity, sovereignty

Best Feature Story
Third Place: Gabe Stern & Dan Lyon: Hole in the Wall: Inside the American Legion on the border
Honorable Mention: Lauren Miller: A foot in two worlds

Print /Online

Best Multimedia
Second Place: Lauren Miller: A foot in two worlds
Third Place: Dan Lyon: Post 1479 fights to honor those who served 

Congratulations, winners!