L’Pree co-authors paper on media perpetuation and disruption of female stereotypes in STEM

Charisse L’Pree Corsbie-Massay, associate professor of communications, co-authored the paper, “The role of media professionals in perpetuating and disrupting stereotypes of women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) fields” with Michele G. Wheatly of Syracuse University. The paper was published in Frontiers in Communication.

Abstract

Women continue to be underrepresented in the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) fields despite efforts to enhance interest and persistence at all levels in the educational pipeline. The “chilly” climate documented for girls and women in STEM exists within a broader communication climate established and reinforced by media professionals. The present study examined the role of media professionals in perpetuating stereotypes of women in STEM through two approaches (1) conducting interviews with seventeen STEM women about their engagement with media professionals and (2) surveying 105 media professionals about their stereotypes about science and scientists. STEM women report positive interactions with the media despite incidents of unprofessionalism, dissonance between the processes and pace of science vs. the media, an undercurrent of issues pertaining to gender and other forms of representation, and an ethical responsibility to engage with media. The survey of media professionals revealed persistent stereotypes about scientists across both genders, and these stereotypes were more pronounced among those who engaged with science as part of their job, particularly among those working in entertainment and advertising and those working outside of journalism and social media. To establish greater equity in STEM fields and the knowledge pipeline, communication scholars must investigate the role of media professionals in this process and consider best practices to disrupt media stereotypes about STEM women.

Bowman co-authors paper on gaming motivations

Nick Bowman, associate professor of communications, co-authored the paper “Covariation among gaming motivations is correlated with anxiety and sociality: A latent class analysis,” with Chingching Chang of Academia Sinica. The paper was published in Entertainment Computing.

Abstract

Understanding what motivates adolescents to play video games is a central pursuit of game scholars, and key to better understanding gaming uses and effects. A latent class analysis on the self-reported gaming motivations of a nationally representative sample of adolescent gamers revealed broader combinations of discrete gaming motivations understood as role-players, fun-seekers, social gamers, and gaming maximizers (further validated through an investigation of gaming genre preferences within each class). Moreover, classification into these categories was influenced by levels of self-reported anxiety (a psychological factor) and sociality (social factors): anxiety levels distinguished gaming maximizers and role-players (higher levels) from social gamers and fun-seekers, and social connectedness unsurprisingly distinguished social gamers (higher levels) from fun-seekers and gaming maximizers from role-players (lower levels). A potential hierarchal model of anxiety and socializing on gaming motivations is suggested, and broader implications for studying gaming motivations are discussed.

Santia co-authors paper on pandemic news coverage

Martina Santia, a postdoctoral scholar in research and creative activity, co-authored the paper, “The Other Side of the Pandemic: Effects of Racialized News Coverage on Attitudes Toward Asians and Immigrants” with Ayla Oden, Seon-Woo Kim, Raymond J. Pingree, Jessica Wyers and Kirill Bryanov, all of Louisiana State University. The paper was published in the International Journal of Communication.

Abstract

Early in the COVID-19 pandemic, U.S. news coverage related to race in 2 distinct ways: coverage of how foreign countries, particularly Asian countries, responded to the pandemic, and coverage of episodes of racism against Asian Americans and Asian-looking individuals. Past research has firmly established that different types of racialized news coverage can lead to very different effects among audiences. This study employs an online survey-experiment to investigate the effects of exposure to these 2 types of racialized news coverage amid the pandemic. Our findings reveal that exposure to an anti-Asian racism news story negatively affected attitudes toward the group depicted in the news. Anti-Asian racism news also increased opposition to immigration. News about an Asian country, however, did not influence attitudes toward Asians and instead decreased opposition to immigration. Trump support played a moderating role for some of these effects. As hate crimes targeting Asians continue in the United States and abroad, the implications of these findings are discussed.

Gutterman publishes paper in Albany Law Review

Roy Gutterman, associate professor and director of the Tully Center for Free Speech, authored the paper, “New Voices, New Rights, New York: A Case Study and a Call for Student Journalist Protections in New York,” which was published in the Albany Law Review.

Abstract

This paper discusses and advocates for New York’s adoption of the Student Journalist Free Speech Act, which would be New York’s version of a New Voices law, which aims to protect student journalists from censorship and their advisors from restrictions or punishment.  
This article is an extension of Gutterman’s work as a co-leader of a statewide coalition that has been working to get a student journalist protection law passed in New York. This ongoing effort has spanned more than five years.  In February, advocates will travel to Albany to meet with legislators, urging them to pass this law.  In 2019, Gutterman was part of a coalition of advocates and student journalists who met with legislators in Albany. This research is part of an ongoing campaign. 

Luttrell and Smith co-author review on biography of public relations icon

Regina Luttrell, associate professor of public relations and associate dean of research and creative activities, and Phoebe Smith, a graduate student in the Newhouse School’s media studies program, co-authored a review of the book “Betsy Ann Plank: The Making of a Public Relations Icon.” The review was published in Journalism & Mass Communication Educator.

Abstract

Betsy Plank was one of the most impactful and well-known public relations practitioners of her time. In their review of the book, “Betsy Ann Plank: The Making of a Public Relations Icon” by Karla K. Gowermedia studies graduate student Phoebe Smith and associate dean Regina Luttrell chronicle her formidable life as a PR pioneer who shaped the field of public relations as we know it today. Smith and Luttrell systematically outline the four principles found within the book: 

1. Public relations is rooted in democracy 
2. Religious faith and public relations are connected  
3. Public relations is a profession 
4. Public relations is gender neutral

Lim, Luttrell and Kinsey co-author paper on digital news users

Joon Soo Lim, associate professor of public relations, co-authored the paper, “News Audiences in the Age of Artificial Intelligence: Perceptions and Behaviors of Optimizers, Mainstreamers, and Skeptics” with Regina Luttrell, associate professor of public relations and associate dean of research and creative activities; Dennis Kinsey, professor of public relations and director of public diplomacy and global communications; and Jun Zhang ’21 Ph.D. of Middle Tennessee State University.

Donghee Shin of Zayed University and Stephen Masiclat, director of education technology at the Innovation Foundation, were also co-authors. The paper was published in the Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media.

Abstract

This study segmented digital news users according to their engagement with news personalization services. A national survey of 1,369 randomly selected digital news users was conducted. Three groups were identified through latent class analysis: Optimizers, Mainstreamers, and Skeptics. Optimizers had the most favorable attitude toward the services and the highest perceived contingency of news personalization. Skeptics showed the least favorable attitude and had the lowest perceived contingency. Optimizers were the most active consumers of digital news platforms, whereas skeptics were lagging in using digital news services. The study discussed the differences between these groups and their implications on news organizations.

Munno co-authors paper on sustainable development in Costa Rica

Greg Munno, assistant professor of magazine, news and digital journalism (MND) co-authored the paper, “Four Perspectives on a Sustainable Future in Nosara, Costa Rica” with Álvaro Salas Castro of Incae Business School; Tina Nabatchi of Syracuse University; and Christian M. Freitag of Indiana University. The paper was published in Sustainability.

Abstract

The town of Nosara on Costa Rica’s Nicoya peninsula is home to a vibrant community of diverse residents and is adjacent to an important turtle nesting site. However, tensions between lifelong residents, more recent transplants, visitors, and developers have increased as more of the world discovers this once-isolated haven. Climate change, income inequality, and alienation from a distant government apparatus have further complicated effective land-use planning and fractured social cohesion. Using a mixed-method approach of in-depth interviews (n = 67), Q methodology (n = 79), and public deliberation (n = 88), we explored residents’ priorities for the future of their town. The results indicate four different perspectives on Nosara’s future. Despite the tensions among those four perspectives, they show consensus on one overarching community issue: the need for a sustainable development plan. The case also shows how Q-methodology can assist scholars and practitioners who embrace participatory approaches to policy development and conflict resolution in the environmental arena.

Faculty, doctoral students and postdoctoral scholar awarded internal funding for research projects

Three faculty members, three doctoral students and one postdoctoral scholar are the recipients of funding through the Newhouse School’s internal grants program. The program is administered by the Office of Research and Creative Activity under the leadership of associate dean Regina Luttrell.

The recipients:

Milton Santiago, assistant professor

Title: Cine Explorer

Professor Santiago will be working to develop an educational game that leverages the preeminent game engine, Unreal Engine, to teach cinematography principles like composition, camera staging, lens selection and visual storytelling. Users will be able to explore a virtual recreation of a well-known scene from an existing major motion picture and then be able to reposition and recompose the camera positions, creating their own interpretation of the creative material. He intends to collaborate with students and industry game developers.

Keonte Coleman, assistant professor and Dona Hayes, associate professor

Title: In Light of the #MeToo Movement and Racial Reckoning: Will TV News Sources Represent Their DMAs’ Diversity When Journalists Can Select Their Sources?

This study aims to find out what happens when broadcast journalists have the option to select their sources. Will those sources mimic the demographics of their news market? This mixed methods study will allow student journalists to code newscasts for the quantitative portion and interview newsroom journalists to discuss sourcing practices for the qualitative portion. The project also inspired an idea to create an inclusive crowdsourced DMA (designated market area) contact list which could help break down sourcing barriers.

Martina Santia, postdoctoral scholar

Title: It’s My Beat and I’ll Cry if I Want to: How Women Journalists Use Emotions When Reporting

Gender remains a key stratification system in numerous professions, including journalism. The proposed study seeks to contribute to the existing scholarship by highlighting the positionality of women as an underrepresented, and often undervalued, minority in the journalism practice. Specifically, this study employs an online survey-experiment to investigate how audiences evaluate women journalists who display emotions when reporting on specific beats. Funds from the Newhouse Internal Program will be used to recruit research participants for the online survey-experiment.

Ryan Wen, doctoral student

Title: “I’m Asian and also not Asian”: Deconstructing the Interplay Between Asian Subgroups’ Health Inequities and the Model Minority Stereotype Created by American Media

Asians in the United States are frequently underrepresented and understudied in health communication research due to an assumption that they are socioeconomically resourceful, educationally successful and therefore unlikely to obtain undesired care. Through deconstructing the systemic oppression coming from within and outside of the Asian community, this project will enrich the existing Newhouse courses by bringing faculty and student attention to the hidden systemic injustice and health disparities veneered by the model minority myth.    

Jocelyn McKinnon-Crowley and Yoon Lee, doctoral students

Title: Impact of Visual Distractions on News Media Viewers 

This project looks at the impact of visual distractions, like pop-ups and banner ads, on readers’ understanding of news information, using psychophysiological methods and follow-up interviews. The research team hopes to discover how mind and body measures can indicate responses to these visual distractions, and what that means for the comprehension of news media. This project will be conducted simultaneously in the Newhouse Extended Reality lab and at a lab on the west coast, in a first of its kind replication study for psychophysiological research in media effects.

Luttrell and Molta publish paper in Journal of Communication Pedagogy

Regina Luttrell, associate professor of public relations and associate dean of research and creative activities, and Daniela Molta, assistant professor of advertising, co-authored the paper, “A Pedagogical Mystique?: Lessons of Incorporating Feminism Into Skills-Based Communication Courses,” which was published in the Journal of Communication Pedagogy.

Abstract

It is imperative that today’s advertising, journalism, mass communication, and public relations students are prepared to engage in corporate activism and corporate social responsibility communications once in the workforce. This article explores the need for incorporating equity-based pedagogy, using feminism as one of many approaches, into skills-based communication courses. The researchers conducted 20 qualitative interviews with academics to discuss various approaches, examples, and learnings. The findings suggest that using a feminist framework to teach skills: (1) enhances the skill being taught, (2) allows students to communicate more effectively, (3) builds life skills, and (4) comes in many forms. The article concludes with consideration to areas for future research and contributes to the understanding of academics engaged in a feminist approach to teaching skills-based communication courses.

Newhouse faculty, students to participate in 2022 NCA convention

Several Newhouse School faculty members, as well as media studies and doctoral students, will participate in the annual convention of the National Communication Association on Nov. 16-20, in New Orleans. Their involvement includes paper presentations, panel appearances and roles as panel moderators and/or paper session discussants.

Note: This is a working list; for the most updated information, visit the NCA site. All times here are Central Standard Time.

Wednesday, Nov. 16

8 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Division: Preconferences

Room: Preservation Hall Studio 9 – 2nd Floor

Location: Marriot

Title: Disciplining Transgender: How States and Sport Legislate and (Re)define PLACE and Participation

Faculty Member: Anne Osborne

12 – 4 p.m.

Division: Preconferences

Room: Oak Alley – 4th Floor

Location: Sheraton

Title: Preconference 10: Using Creative and Arts-Based Research Approaches to Expand Equity, Advocacy, and Impact of Health and Disability Communication Research

Faculty Member: Srivi Ramasubramanian 

Thursday, Nov. 17

8 – 9:15 a.m.

Division: Games Studies Division

Room: Preservation Hall Studio 8 – 2nd Floor

Location: Marriott

Title: Understanding Relationship Maintenance Behaviors and Video Game Use Effects in Romantic Relationships 

Faculty Member: Nick Bowman

8 – 9:15 a.m.

Division: Mass Communication Division

Room: Mardi Gras Ballroom Salon B – 3rd Floor

Location: Marriott

Title: Hyper(In)Visibility, White Christonormative gaze, and ecological discursive systems: Sikh representations in the news 

Faculty Member: Srivi Ramasubramanian

12:30 – 1:45 p.m.

Division: Black Caucus

Room: Grand Couteau – 5th Floor

Location: Sheraton

Title: “More than ‘Magic’”: Exploring Black Women’s Representation, Resilience, and PLACE in Leadership Activism

Faculty Member: Rockell A. Brown Burton

2 – 3:15 p.m.

Division: Game Studies Division

Room: Preservation Hall Studio 8 – 2nd Floor

Location: Marriott

Title: Excited for Eudaimonia? An Emergent Thematic Analysis of Player

Expectations of Upcoming Video Games

Faculty Member: Nick Bowman 

2 – 3:15 p.m.

Division: NCA Publications Council

Room: Mardi Gras Ballroom Salon E – 3rd Floor

Location: Marriott

Title: How to Get Published and Navigating the NCA Journals – Part II

Faculty Member: Srivi Ramasubramanian

3 – 4:45 p.m.

Division: Research in Progress Roundtables

Room: Grand Ballroom D/E – 5th Floor

Location: Sheraton

Title: Table 10: Immersive Media  

Faculty Member: Nick Bowman

3 – 4:45 p.m.

Division: Activism and Social Justice Division

Room: Maurepas – 3rd floor

Location: Sheraton

Title: Honoring PLACE: Digital Activism through Communications 

Faculty Member: Regina Luttrell

Friday, Nov.  18

7:30 – 10:45 a.m.

Division: NCA National Office

Room: River Tower, Balcony L – 4th Floor

Location: Marriott 

Title: NCA Journal Editors’ Workshop

Faculty Member: Srivi Ramasubramanian 

9:30 – 10:45 a.m.

Division: Top Papers of the Game Studies Division

Room: Preservation Hall Studio 8 – 2nd Floor

Location: Marriott

Title: ‘Makes me feel like I was born in the wrong era’: Gamer self-efficacy and appreciation are correlated with historical nostalgia when playing a retrogame

Faculty Member: Nick Bowman

9:30 – 10:45 a.m.

Division: Korean American Communication Association 

Room: Napoleon Ballroom B2 – 3rd floor

Location: Sheraton

Title: Insights from Asian Female Educators’ Experience in Communication and Public Relations 

Faculty Member: Moon Lee

11 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

Division: Human Communication and Technology Division

Room: Gallier AB – 4th Floor

Location: Sheraton

Title: What’s the Big Idea? Inclusion, Diversity, Equity, and Access in Human Communication Technology Research 

Faculty Member: Nick Bowman

11 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

Division: Partnership for Progress on the Digital Divide 

Room: Endymion/Mid-City – 8th Floor 

Location: Sheraton

Title: Media Mastery: Redefining Media Literacy in the Digital Age  

Faculty Members: Regina Luttrell and Jason Davis

M.S. Student: Phoebe Smith

11 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

Division: Top Faculty Papers in International And Intercultural Communication 

Room: Napoleon Ballroom B2 – 3rd Floor  

Location: Sheraton

Title: Indigenous Media Forms, Frames, & Futurisms: Comparing Anishinaabe and Mainstream News Coverage of the Line #3 Pipe Project  

Faculty Member: Srivi Ramasubramanian

Ph.D. Student: Emily Riewestahl 

2 – 3:15 p.m.

Division: Scholars’ Office Hours

Room: Grand Ballroom D/E – 5th Floor

Location: Sheraton

Title: NCA Scholars’ Office Hours

Faculty Member: Srivi Ramasubramanian

2 – 3:15 p.m.

Division: Experiential Learning in Communication Division

Room: Mardi Gras Ballroom Salon B – 3rd Floor 

Location: Marriott

Title: SPARK A ‘Diversity First’ IDEA: An Approach to Equitable PR Campaigns 

Faculty Member: Regina Luttrell 

3:30 – 4:45 p.m.

Division: International and Intercultural Communication Division

Room: Napoleon Ballroom B2 – 3rd Floor

Location: Sheraton

Title: International and Intercultural Communication Division Business Meeting

Faculty Member: Srivi Ramasubramanian

3:30 – 4:45 p.m.

Division: Activism and Social Justice Division

Room: Oakley – 4th Floor 

Location: Sheraton

Title: Finding Our PLACE in Activism and Social Justice: A Rich Discussion about in-Progress Works from Graduate Students in the Division 

Ph.D. Student: Benjamin P. Tetteh 

Saturday, Nov. 19

9:30 – 10:45 a.m.

Division: Communications and Sports Division

Room: Preservation Hall Studio Foyer – 2nd Floor

Location: Marriott

Title: How Political Polarization shapes the Trust in Media: A Study of the Perceptions of COVID-19

Ph.D. Student: Abdulaziz Altawil

2 – 3:15 p.m.

Division: Latina/o Communication Studies Division

Room: Napoleon Ballroom B1 – 3rd Floor 

Location: Sheraton

Title: Mi Gente: Representations of Latinx on Netflix’s Gentefied

Ph.D. Students: Raiana de Carvalho and Kandice N. Green

12:30 – 1:45 p.m.

Division: Women’s Caucus Division

Room: Gallier AB – 4th Floor 

Location: Sheraton 

Title: Mentorship and Relationship Building with the Indigenous Caucus

Faculty Member: Srivi Ramasubramanian

2 – 3:15 p.m.

Division: Health Communication Division

Room: Napoleon Ballroom B1 – 3rd Floor 

Location: Sheraton

Title: How College Students Interpret and Use Social Media as a Source of Sexual Consent Communication

Faculty Member: Rebecca Ortiz

2 – 3:15 p.m.

Division: International and Intercultural Communication Division 

Room: Mardi Gras Ballroom Salon E – 3rd Floor 

Location: Marriott

Title: Honoring PLACE and Creating Space for the Mentorship and Community-Building in the International and Intercultural Communication Division

Faculty Member: Srivi Ramasubramanian

3:30 – 4:45 p.m.

Division: NCA First Vice President

Room: Preservation Hall Studio 2 – 2nd Floor

Location: Marriott

Title: Honoring Community: Advocating for Liberation Through Community-Centered Scholarship 

Faculty Member: Srivi Ramasubramanian

3:30 – 4:45 p.m.

Division: Black Caucus

Room: Gallier AB – 4th Floor

Location: Sheraton

Title: In Honor of Ketanji Brown Jackson: How We Persevere 

Faculty Member: Rockell A. Brown Burton

5 – 6:30 p.m.

Room: Grand Ballroom C – 5th floor

Location: Sheraton

Title: NCA Award Presentation

Faculty Member: Srivi Ramasubramanian

Sunday, Nov. 20

8 – 9:15 a.m.

Division: Mass Communication Division

Room: Preservation Hall Studio 4/5 – 2nd Floor

Location: Marriott

Title: Honoring PLACE in Media Literacy: Equity, Voice, and Action for Social Justice  

Faculty Member: Srivi Ramasubramanian

8 – 9:15 a.m.

Division: Black Caucus

Room: Gallier AB – 4th Floor

Location: Sheraton

Title: Honoring African Epistemologies in Communications Studies  

Ph.D. Student: Benjamin P. Tetteh

9:30 – 10:45 a.m.

Division: Public Relations Division

Room: Preservation Hall Studio 6 – 2nd Floor

Location: Marriott

Title: Mitigating Harm: To PLACE PR Ethics at the Center of AI and IoT Strategy 

Faculty Member: Regina Luttrell 

11 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

Division: Women’s Caucus Division

Room: Napoleon Ballroom A3 – 3rd Floor

Location: Marriott

Title: Empowering Students: How to Equity-Based Pedagogy Can Transform Skills-Based Courses 

Faculty Members: Regina Luttrell and Daniela Molta

11 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

Division: Political Communication Division

Room: Bayside A – 4th Floor

Location: Sheraton

Title: Interpersonal and Interpersonal Ways of Thinking: Applying the O-S-R-O-R Model to the 2020 Presidential Election 

Faculty Member: Lars Wilnat

Ph.D. Students: Jian Shi, Yu Tian and Shengjie Yao